Author: Iwan Morus

September 21, 2016 Iwan Morus No comments exist

Author: Iwan Rhys Morus


A few years ago, during one of our occasional forays to Hay on Wye and its second hand bookshops, I came across a boys’ adventure novel called The Radium Casket, published in 1926 (by Oxford University Press – I had no idea they published such things, though a few seconds research showed me how wrong I was: https://global.oup.com/education/children). Obviously, no historian of physics was going to leave something like that in a bookshop, so I bought it. It’s a classic imperialist yarn, set in China in the aftermath of the Boxer Rebellion. The British hero rescues a Chinese fugitive from his attackers and the dying man bequeaths him a mysterious casket filled with a strange silvery metal that turns out to have some peculiar properties. (more…)

May 4, 2016 Iwan Morus 2 comments

Author: Iwan Rhys Morus


71t2ssnlpplI’ve just finished re-reading a book I first (and last) read when I was twelve or thirteen. Welsh SF was a rare commodity in the 1970s. The classic Wythnos yng Nghymru Fydd (A Week in Future Wales) by Islwyn Ffowc Elis had been published in 1957. It was an utopian, time-travelling vision of a future independence married to a warning of what might go wrong. I can vaguely remember something about travelling to Venus as another example, and the Welsh children’s magazine Cymru’r Plant serialized a space travelling adventure story sometime in the late 60s or early 70s. Owain Owain’s Y Dydd Olaf (The Last Day), published (and read by me) in 1976, was certainly not a space opera adventure, or a piece of Plaid Cymru propaganda. It was weird and uncomfortable, which is probably why I didn’t read it again. (more…)

April 18, 2016 The Project Team 4 comments

Background

The future. The moving frontier. These are the adventures of the AHRC project Unsettling Scientific Stories in its 36-month mission to seek out new insights, science histories, and understandings of sociology, and go where no one has gone before…

 

What is the future? How does it change? Why is it important to understand the different ways in which the future has been imagined across the long 20th Century? What does science fiction have in common with (the histories of) science?  (more…)